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The two primary objectives of this course are to provide students with (1) an understanding of the conceptual framework that unifies biological science, and (2) an appreciation for the diversity and abundance of a group of organisms that comprises over 95% of the animal species on Earth. These two objectives are emphasized because (a) a conceptual understanding of biological science is fundamental to creative thought in this field, and (b) the diversity of invertebrate and vertebrate species provides excellent examples of these central principles. An understanding of this framework will permit students to comprehend (and propose their own) scientific explanations for the distribution, abundance and diversity of species. Description and classification of species can then become an exercise in scientific exploration, rather than simply one of rote memorization.

This 4-credit course includes lecture and laboratory components. It is a survey of the "lower invertebrate" phyla (Porifera through Chordata, including Blastocoelomates), using selected taxa to illustrate concepts in evolution, systematics, physiology, morphology, life history, ecology and behavior. Note that "lower invertebrates" (as opposed to "higher invertebrates," that is, Brachiopoda through Arthropoda) refers in this course neither to relative complexity nor similarity to vertebrates for the organism in question. Instead, these terms refer to the apparent order in which a taxonomic group appears to have arisen over evolutionary time within the Kingdome we call Animalia. Lectures will concentrate on organizing and interpreting information about invertebrate and vertebrate animals to illustrate (1) evolutionary relationships within and among taxa, and (2) adaptations that permit species to inhabit particular environments. Laboratories will provide living and preserved examples of taxa described in lecture and in reading assignments, as well as experimental procedures that will permit students to explore "animal” organization and body function. The practical aspects of this course allow for students to improve their drawing skills and develop some basic skills in the respectful and conservative handling of specimens.

The Environmental Physics course at the MICO University College seeks to equip learners with skills, attitudes, knowledge and values of understanding of the environment in a bid to increase consciousness and sensitivity to environmental challenges.

In order to achieve its goal of increasing the participants' consciousness of environmental challenges through understanding the processes that sustain natural systems, the course will introduce the learner to aspects of the dynamics of the atmosphere, solar radiation, the hydrosphere and alternative sources of energy.

The course will present the concepts to the learner in a real life context through practical exercises and investigations of applications of the theoretical concepts in real life contexts. The course leader will employ a diversity learning activities and assessment strategies which include demonstrations and research investigations.

There are four units in this course

Unit 1:   The Earth's atmosphere.

Unit 2:   Solar radiation.

Unit 3:   The hydrosphere.

Unit 4:   Alternative sources of energy.

The course introduces the learner to the application of core principles of physics into areas of the medical sciences. The content of the course will introduce the learner to the biomechanics of muscle of the human body, locomotion, speech, hearing and sight and to four forms of medical imaging. The learner will also be given an opportunity to peek into the world of imaging technologies and how they are operated.

The course will present the concepts to the learner in a real life context through practical exercises and investigations of applications of the theoretical concepts in real life contexts. The course leader will employ a diversity learning activities and assessment strategies which include demonstrations and research investigations.

There are four units in this course

Unit 1:   Human muscular biomechanics and locomotion

Unit 2:   Physics of human speech, hearing and sight

Unit 3:   Medical imaging

Unit 4:   Dosimetry and medical imaging technology

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course will add to students' knowledge of the structure and function of transport and reproductive systems and mechanisms in plants and animals (mammals in particular). An overview of methods employed by other organisms will be done to give an appreciation of diversity and relative complexity. Dysfunction and disease of these systems in humans as it relates to health and well-being will also be discussed.Skill development via laboratory activities continues.

Dear Participants:

Welcome to the online portal for the UCJ Upgrade for Biology. This moodle platform is designed to facilitate the smooth completion of the recommended requirements for the Biology Majors in Science Education.This is due to the fact that the 2 Science Methodology courses which account for 6 credits were not deemed Specialization Courses hence the deficit.

BACKGROUND

The Science Education degree has been accredited however, there was one major recommendation from the UCJ regarding the programme  i.e. ALL GRADUATES COMPLETE AN ADDITIONAL 6 CREDIT HOURS OF WORK. A decision was taken to add an additional credit to six (6) final year courses. This credit is equivalent to 15 hours of instruction. The Biology sections has further refined this to mean for each course there will be 6 lessons with 2.5 hours of instruction. Hence you will see the following:


  1. Lesson One
  2. Lesson Two
  3. Lesson Three
  4. Lesson Four
  5. Lesson Five
  6. Lesson Six

We trust that you will complete ALL THE LESSONS FOR EACH COURSE.


All the Best,


Lisa S. Caleb



The use of geographic information systems (GIS) technology and methods in schools has tremendous potential to incorporate issues-based and inquiry-based education, and to increase the relevancy and utility of the disciplines in which they are used, as well as accelerate geographic inquiry. Geographic inquiry is not just for Geographers, but for all persons with an interest in understanding spatial phenomena, or understanding data from a different perspective.  The four GIS units will allow the student teacher to view, understand, question, interpret, and visualize data in many ways that reveal relationships, patterns, and trends.

The two primary objectives of this course are to provide students with (1) an understanding of the conceptual framework that unifies biological science, and (2) an appreciation for the diversity and abundance of a group of organisms that comprises over 95% of the animal species on Earth. These two objectives are emphasized because (a) a conceptual understanding of biological science is fundamental to creative thought in this field, and (b) the diversity of invertebrate and vertebrate species provides excellent examples of these central principles. An understanding of this framework will permit students to comprehend (and propose their own) scientific explanations for the distribution, abundance and diversity of species. Description and classification of species can then become an exercise in scientific exploration, rather than simply one of rote memorization.

 

This 4-credit course includes lecture and laboratory components. It is a survey of the "lower invertebrate" phyla (Porifera through Chordata, including Blastocoelomates), using selected taxa to illustrate concepts in evolution, systematics, physiology, morphology, life history, ecology and behavior. Note that "lower invertebrates" (as opposed to "higher invertebrates," that is, Brachiopoda through Arthropoda) refers in this course neither to relative complexity nor similarity to vertebrates for the organism in question. Instead, these terms refer to the apparent order in which a taxonomic group appears to have arisen over evolutionary time within the Kingdome we call Animalia. Lectures will concentrate on organizing and interpreting information about invertebrate and vertebrate animals to illustrate (1) evolutionary relationships within and among taxa, and (2) adaptations that permit species to inhabit particular environments. Laboratories will provide living and preserved examples of taxa described in lecture and in reading assignments, as well as experimental procedures that will permit students to explore “animal” organization and body function. The practical aspects of this course allow for students to improve their drawing skills and develop some basic skills in the respectful and conservative handling of specimens.

 



COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course will add to students’ knowledge of the structure and function of transport and reproductive systems and mechanisms in plants and animals (mammals in particular). An overview of methods employed by other organisms will be done to give an appreciation of diversity and relative complexity. Dysfunction and disease of these systems in humans as it relates to health and well-being will also be discussed.Skill development via laboratory activities continues.

This course provides opportunities for participants to gain valuable skills in the evaluation and selection of innovative information and communication technology resources based on their appropriateness to specific tasks. The course is competence driven and therefore participants will explore and utilize a range of technological tools that can be employed for educational management and instructional delivery. Emphasis will be on developing an understanding of the characteristics, purpose and design of ICT resources used to provide solution to real life problems in the educational arena. Participants will develop proficiency in the use of modern ICT resources through hands-on experience in the computer laboratory.